2 October 2017

MICHAEL ARMSTRONG: THE SCREENPLAYS. REVIEW BY SANDRA HARRIS.



MICHAEL ARMSTRONG: THE SCREENPLAYS. REVIEW BY SANDRA HARRIS. ©

'Michael Armstrong is creating history by being the first film-maker to publish his entire screenwriting output. With the original uncut screenplays in print for the first time ever and peppered with a mixture of wildly entertaining anecdotes, astounding behind-the-scenes revelations, creative and educational insights and brutal 'no holds barred' honesty, these books are guaranteed to provide a completely new kind of reading experience while offering a unique insight into the movie industry. Starting from his first professional screenplay written in 1960 when he was only fifteen and which he subsequently directed in 1968, the books will ultimately encompass a career that has spanned over fifty years. The books will include not only those screenplays which made it onto a cinema screen but, for the first time ever, all those that didn't- and the reasons why...'


The above passage is lifted directly from Michael Armstrong's own website and I think it describes his work better than I ever could, but I've been asked to say a few words myself in promotion of this fantastic new collection of books that he's putting out, therefore I will now proceed to say several. Words, that is. Give me an inch and I'll almost certainly take a mile, haha. I'm a pushy broad and, anyway, there's actually a lot to say about the man and his works.

Michael Armstrong (there's a really cute photo of him on the back covers of the books!) is the screenwriter/director behind a load of films that you guys probably already know quite well. Some of you may even know his name already but, for others, this may be your first time hearing it.

Unlikely, as this rather prolific and obviously hard-working fella's been penning film scripts for over fifty years, but you never know. Some folks who've been on Mars since the turn of the last century may need to be filled in on all the developments in the film industry since they've been 'off-planet,' so to speak...!

Michael's first movie was a short film called 'THE IMAGE' and, as far as I know, it marked the first screen appearance of a certain David Bowie, who later went on to make flicks like THE MAN WHO FELL TO EARTH, LABYRINTH and THE HUNGER, my personal favourite of his films. Yes, yes, I do know that he was a musician as well, thanks very much for pointing that out...

Michael Armstrong had the pleasure, and it must have been a huge one, of directing Mr. Bowie first, though, and now the book of that script is available to buy as part of Michael's gorgeous collection.

I was sent this book by the good people at Paper Dragon Productions, who published it in November 2016, and there's a great ghostly old photo of David Bowie on the cover. Very fitting, as he actually plays a ghost in the film, believe it or not.

As the musician is now strumming his guitar in heaven and hob-nobbing away with all the musical celebs who positively raced to follow him up that celestial elevator in 2016 alone, it'd make a lovely souvenir of the man himself.

Not to mention that Michael Armstrong's writing is a treat to read. Reading the pictures he paints with his words, as it were, is not much different to seeing them played out in front of you on the cinema screen.

I read the script of HOUSE OF THE LONG SHADOWS on a dreary Monday morning when I was supposed to be doing boring housework. It was a more than acceptable alternative, I can assure you. While I was reading it, I amused and then annoyed the hell out of the family members present by constantly bursting out with: 

'They actually say this in the film! This is in the film, and this is in the film, and Christopher Lee actually DOES this in the film!' 

And so on until they threw the book at me. The book and several cushions and a plastic sheep to boot. I said no more from then on, humph. I sulked royally and kept any additional utterings to myself.

HOUSE OF THE LONG SHADOWS, the film-script book of which features a darling haunted house on the cover, wasn't just a great slice of 'Eighties horror hokum. It had the distinction of being the first and, as it turned out, the only film to ever feature the four greatest horror icons of all time all together. Namely, the aforementioned Christopher Lee, Vincent Price, Peter Cushing and John Carradine as well. Horror royalty, every one of 'em.

There was a great supporting cast starring alongside the lads as well, people like Desi Arnaz Jr., Sheila Keith, a smashing horror icon in her own right, and Julie Peasgood, you know, 'er off BROOKSIDE.

I loved a nice bit of Brookie, I did, on a Sat'day afternoon back in the day. Eatin' me dinner while the Omnibus was on the telly, like. I'm imagining these words in a Scouser accent, by the way, so you'd better be too, or I'll 'ave ta tell ya to do one, as it were.

Anyway, Michael based his marvellous screnplay on the 1913 novel, SEVEN KEYS TO BALDPATE by the curiously named Earl Derr Biggers. It's the story of a young American novelist who holes up at the titular Baldpate Manor to speed-write a book in order to win a bet with his agent.

Baldpate Manor is a magnificent old Welsh mansion that's supposed to be deserted, the perfect oasis of peace in which to do some serious writing. Supposed to be deserted. In fact, it ends up being more populated than the post office on dole day, and the baffled novelist will have a hell of a job getting any writing at all done with all the famous faces popping up continuously to distract him from his goal.

The script may have been based on someone else's novel, but the little tributes and homages and nods in it to various iconic horror movies like PSYCHO are all Michael's idea and no-one else's. His writing really sets a scene for the reader too. Here's a passage in which the novelist, Kenneth, and the damsel-in-distress Mary ('er off Brookie), are entering the fabulous old dining-room of Baldpate Manor:

'They enter the dining-room and stare in amazement.

The enormous room is brilliantly illuminated by candles.

The long polished table is formally laid out: cut-glass and silver, sparkling royally.

By the fire: GRISBANE and VICTORIA and the mysterious figure of SEBASTIAN; a slight, gaunt-faced man in his sixties, wearing a wing collar and a dark suit.

The three of them are gathered in a conspiratorial huddle. They break quickly, like naughty children caught out. KENNETH stares in amazement at the scene before him.'

HOUSE OF THE LONG SHADOWS: PAGES 73-74.

I don't know about you guys, but I can totally picture that scene in my mind's eye. I'm moving now to the scene where the motley crew of HOUSE OF THE LONG SHADOWS enter Roderick's room for the first time. I won't tell you who Roderick is but, after reading these lines from the script, I reckon you'll be bursting to know...

'A silence hovers over the room as they move slowly about, looking in amazement at its bizarre sights: clues to Roderick's warped mind.

A toy fort on the floor, laid out as for a savage battle...

Scores of soldiers scattered around as though dead; all horribly mutilated,

The aftermath of an imagined massacre.

MARY gives an involuntary shudder as she spies in the corner of the room...

Piles of small animal bones neatly arranged into heaps,

Skeletons of dead rats and mice...

Hundreds of tiny white bones glinting in the candlelight:

Tiny white bones picked clean.

KENNETH glances behind him to notice the back of the bedroom door...

Down which enormous scratch marks can be seen...

Indicating the powerful fury of strong fingernails having clawed deeply

Into the dark oak wood.

VICTORIA indicates a narrow panel at the bottom of the door.

VICTORIA: I'd slide food into him through there... every night...

HOUSE OF THE LONG SHADOWS: PAGES 105-106.

Cripes! Fair sent a shiver down my spine, that did, when I read it there in black and white It's every bit as effective as the corresponding scenes in the film, if not more so. Sometimes, when you read something really chilling, your mind works overtime visualising the scene and you do a better job yourself than the film-maker, almost.

In the extra features on the film HOUSE OF THE LONG SHADOWS, Michael Armstrong reminisces fondly, alongside 'er off BROOKSIDE, about the making of the film. He talks so passionately and enthusiastically about it that it's lovely to see. He comes across as the kind of guy who'd sit chatting to you in the pub about films till the cows come home, or the landlord calls time, whichever comes first.

I was also sent the script book of THE BLACK PANTHER, by the way. This was the name given to Donald Neilson, the British armed robber, kidnapper and murderer whose abduction of wealthy British teenager Lesley Whittle in 1975 is the subject of Michael's controversial screenplay. The 1977 film was even banned for a bit but a change of heart by the British Film Institute saw it taking its rightful place amongst other important British films of the period.

So that's it, anyway. I've said way more than the few words I was asked for but whatevs, it was an interesting subject and I enjoyed myself. Michael's books can be purchased through his website and from Paper Dragon Productions, Michael's publishers, and they'd make the perfect present for film buffs and students of cinema everywhere. I'm keeping mine for myself, however. Ain't no-one but me getting their hands on these babies...!




AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY OF SANDRA HARRIS.

Sandra Harris is a Dublin-based novelist, film blogger and movie reviewer. She has studied Creative Writing and Film-Making. She has published a number of e-books on the following topics: horror film reviews, multi-genre film reviews, womens' fiction, erotic fiction, erotic horror fiction and erotic poetry. Several new books are currently in the pipeline. You can browse or buy any of Sandra's books by following the link below straight to her Amazon Author Page:

http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B015GDE5RO

You can contact Sandra at:


http://sandrafirstruleoffilmclubharris.wordpress.com







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