Showing posts with label anchor bay uk. Show all posts
Showing posts with label anchor bay uk. Show all posts

23 December 2012

Swelter In The Suspense With 247°F Coming To UK January

No comments: Links to this post

The temperature is definitely rising as we announce the arrival of the hottest high concept thriller of 2013 that's guaranteed to make you sweat like never before, 247°F  out on DVD and Blu-ray through Anchor Bay UK on 28th January 2013.

The horrors, thrills and perils of “Frozen” are taken to the opposite extreme and the heat is most definitely on as a trio of trim, toned twenty-somethings are trapped in a sauna and, with the temperature rising and no sign of escape, a wild, hot and steamy weekend of “bare babes and brews” soon turns into a primal fight for survival.

Based on true events, this sweltering suspenser follows a trio of trim, toned twenty-somethings that become trapped in a sauna. With the temperature rising and no sign of escape, a wild, hot and steamy weekend of “bare babes and brews” soon turns into a primal fight for survival! Think “Frozen” but with less snow and more glistening breasts and glowing pecs!
Three years after witnessing the tragic death of her boyfriend in a car accident, Jenna is still struggling to come to terms with her loss. Hoping a carefree weekend away will help, Jenna’s best friend since childhood, good-time party girl Renee, invites her to stay at a remote lakeside cabin along with her jock boyfriend, Michael, and his best buddy, Ian. But the promised weekend of partying, boozing and chilling soon turns into a nightmare when three of the group find themselves inexplicably locked in the cabin’s sauna with no apparent way out.

Scream queen Scout Taylor-Compton (here reunited with “Halloween” co-star Tyler Mane) becomes a veritable “steam queen” starring alongside gorgeous rising star Christina Ulloa and hunky co-stars Van Winkle and Michael Copon in this sultry, slick and uber-sexy horror that's guaranteed to fire up fans of survival situation horrors such as “Frozen”, “Open Water” and “Buried”.


Pre-Order:247ยบ (247 Degrees Fahrenheit) [DVD]

22 September 2012

Win Michael Biehn's The Victim On Blu-Ray

No comments: Links to this post

















Having emerged from the most pivotal Sci-Fi films ever to grace our screen, Michael Biehn takes to the Director’s chair to gain ownership of the grindhouse genre having already channelled his onscreen vivacity in Robert Rodriguez's “Planet Terror” and having learnt the modus operandi from a directing mastermind in James Cameron.

To celebrate the release of Anchor Bay's ‘The Victim’ on DVD and Blu-ray on 24th September, we have some amazing posters and Blu-rays to give away!

During a social outing deep in the quiet woodland with close friend Mary, Annie’s life is put in jeopardy when she is witness to a violent act at the hands of two Sheriff’s Deputies. Fleeing from the attackers she stumbles across Kyle, a shady recluse living in a cabin the middle of the woods. The rugged loner stays far from civilisation, which is until a knock on the door throws his solitary life into chaos. Having been affected by Mary’s desperate bid for her life, Kyle bravely decides to take Sheriff’s law into his own hands. Two worlds collide in this psychological thriller that will make you question your trust in mankind. Who is The Victim?

To win this prize please answer the following question:

Q. What recent British film festival did The Victim make it's UK premier at?

Send your Answer, Name, Address, Postcode and answer to 25+25-5= email it to winatcinehouseuk@gmail.com, Deadline: Sunday 14th October 2012 (2359hrs).Aged 18 or over to enter

Terms and conditions
  • This prize is non transferable.
  • No cash alternatives apply.
  • UK & Irish entries only
    The Peoples Movies, Cinehouse and Anchor Bay UK have the right to alter, delay or cancel this competition without any notice
  • The competition is not opened to employees, family, friends of The Peoples Movies, Cinehouse,Anchor Bay UK employees
  • This competition is promoted on behalf of Anchor Bay UK
  • If this prize becomes unavailable we have the right to offer an alternative prize instead.
  • The Prize is to win the The Victim Blu-Ray&Posters
  • To enter this competition you must send in your answer, name, address only, Deadline October 14th, 2012 (2359hrs)
  • Will only accept entries sent to the correct email (winatcinehouseuk@gmail.com), any other entry via any other email will be void.
  • automated entries are not allowed and will be disqualified, which could result you been banned
  • The Peoples Movies, Cinehouse takes no responsibility for delayed, lost, stolen prizes
  • Prizes may take from days to a few months for delivery which is out of our control.
  • The competition is opened to Aged 18  and over 
  • Unless Stated Please  Do Not Include Telephone Numbers, we don’t need them and if you include your telephone number Cinehouse and The People’s Movies are not responsible for the security of the number.
  • The winning entries will be picked at random and contacted by email
  • This competition is bound by the rules of Scotland,England & Wales, Northern Ireland, Ireland.
  • By sending your entry for this competition you are confirming you have read and agreed to these Terms & Conditions.
…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..
UK Competitions and Prize Draws at UKwins
Loquax Competitions
Free Competitions
ThePrizeFinder – UK Competitions

Blu-Ray Review: Michael Biehn's The Victim

No comments: Links to this post






















★★★☆☆


Michael Biehn continues to surprise viewers thirty-five years into his career:  after rising to fame in the likes of The Terminator and Aliens, Biehn still remains a relevant and much-loved face in the movie world - continuing to impress in cult hits Planet Terror and The Divide. Now the veteran star writes, directs and stars in his debut feature film, The Victim, alongside Jennifer Blanc and horror favourite, Danielle Harris.

The Victim, a horror-infused thriller, follows the unlikely pairing of a shady recluse, Kyle (Biehn), and a young woman (Blanc) who find themselves on a cat and mouse chase from two corrupt cops.

Biehn's debut is a challenging one - it seems to have been labelled as a grindhouse film (one just needs to look at the DVD cover featuring Biehn holding an axe behind a blood-soaked V sign), however, this is not the case. The Victim is far more of a straight-forward thriller with the odd moment of sex or violence thrown in to generate some excitement. Whilst Biehn does deliver a completely competent debut, it proves to be little else than competent, despite some glimpses of potential. 

The Victim will prove to be an entertaining way to spend eighty minutes for audiences with an open mind or Biehn fans - with the actor's debut boasting solid performances and tense, unsettling direction. Biehn excels as a man thrust into a deadly chase between corrupt cops and a victimised young woman, Annie. The growing relationship between Kyle and Annie proves to be of some interest, despite the lack of build up it receives - the recluse and the victim sleep together within ten minutes of meeting which seems to come out of the blue. Although, credit is due to Jennifer Blanc, who manages to make a morally questionable character completely likeable. Danielle Harris also makes a welcome appearance in the film's opening as Annie's carefree, floozy friend who is accidentally killed by one of the corrupt officers (leading to Annie escaping and the ensuing chase).

The Victim is filled with moments that could have been far more impressive if carried out with slightly more precision. One such moments sees Annie running through the woods - we are shown the character running but not what is chasing her - with a couple of simple shots of the cops tailing Annie, Biehn could have made the scene far more gripping. This could all come down to Biehn's lack of experience behind the camera or simply due to the shortage of time available on the shoot.

Another issue with The Victim is the film's uneven tone. It lacks the fun, gritty charm that a B-Movie/grindhouse film should have but at the same time does not feel realistic enough to be a serious thriller.  Had Biehn's script had a little more fun or moments of grindhouse violence or exploitation then it would have been a far more memorable, vibrant film.

The Victim is a respectable debut for Michael Biehn, who does a solid job as director and star. It proves to be a reasonably enjoyable way to spend eighty minutes, although would have fared far better had it taken itself less seriously and embraced the fun of the grindhouse genre.

Andrew McArthur

Stars: Michael Biehn, Danielle Harris , Jennifer Blanc
Director: Michael Biehn
Release: 24th September 2012
Certificate: 15 (UK)

2 July 2012

Win Win Lion Of The Desert & The Message On Blu-Ray

No comments: Links to this post


















Every epic movie lover's collection should include these two silver screen classics: Lion of the Desert and The Message (Anchor Bay). Both are available to buy on DVD and Blu-Ray for the first time on 2nd July and include legendary stars such as Anthony Quinn, Rod Steiger, John Gielgud and Oliver Reed.

To celebrate their release, we've got three copies of each to give away on Blu-Ray!

Lion Of The Desert - The year is 1929 and Italian dictator Benito Mussolini faces a 20-year-long war waged by Bedouin patriots who are resisting Italian colonisation and the establishment of “The Fourth Shore” – essentially a re-birth of a Roman Empire in Africa. Hoping to crush the rebellion, Mussolini appoints the ruthless General Rodolfo Graziani, a man who would come to be known as the “Butcher of Fezzan”. Leading the resistance is Omar Mukhtar, a teacher by profession but a guerrilla by obligation, one who has committed himself to fighting a bloody war than he knows cannot be won in his lifetime. As tanks and airplanes are deployed in the desert for the first time, the Bedouin realize their primitive weaponry is no match for the might of the Italian Army. But, driven by courage and inspired by their leader, they continue to fight on.

The Message - It is the 7th Century in Mecca, and powerful leaders are in conflict with Mohammad who attacks their way of life and the injustices it produces. Claiming to have seen a vision of the Angel Gabriel, Mohammad calls on the people of Mecca to cast aside the 300 idols of the Kaaba and to worship one God. Despite bitter opposition from the leaders of Mecca, Mohammad and his faithful followers meet secretly to listen to the revelations of the word of God. The leaders respond with persecution, forcing the Moslems to leave Mecca and take sanctuary in Medina. After receiving a revelation from God, Mohammad agrees to take arms against Mecca and battle until more people are converted to the emerging religion and ready to accept the prophet. At the Wells of Bedr the inexperienced Moslem troops are victorious but find themselves beaten at the Battle of Uhud and accept a ten-year truce, so that they can continue to spread the word of God…

For a chance to win these films on Blu-Ray answer the following question:


Q.Who is the former Middle East Dictator Who Financed Lion Of The Desert For $35million in 1981?

a.Saddam Hussein 

b.Muammar Gadaffi 

c.Ferdinand Marcos

Send your answer , name, address, to have your email to  cinehouseuk@gmail.com header As ‘Anchor Bay Films’. Deadline:July 22nd, 2012 (2359hrs) .

Terms and Conditions



  • This prize is non-transferable.
  • No cash alternatives apply.
  • UK & Irish entries only
    The Peoples Movies, Cinehouse and Anchor Bay UK have the right to alter, delay or cancel this competition without any notice
  • The competition is not opened to employees, family, friends of The Peoples Movies, Cinehouse, Anchor Bay UK employees
  • This competition is promoted on behalf of Anchor Bay UK
  • The Prize is to win LION OF THE DESERT, The Message on Blu ray, 3 winners
  • To enter this competition you must send in your answer, name, address only, Deadline July 22nd, 2012 (2359hrs)
  • Will only accept entries sent to the correct email (cinehouseuk@gmail.com), any other entry via any other email will be void.
  • The Peoples Movies, Cinehouse takes no responsibility for delayed, lost, stolen prizes
  • The competition is opened to Aged 16  and over 
  • Unless Stated Please  Do Not Include Telephone Numbers, we don’t need them
  • The winning entries will be picked at random and contacted by email
  • By sending your entry for this competition you are confirming you have read and agreed to these Terms & Conditions.
…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..
UK Competitions and Prize Draws at UKwins
Loquax Competitions
Free Competitions
ThePrizeFinder – UK Competitions

16 April 2012

Review: WICKER TREE

No comments: Links to this post

★★★★★

A magnificent fusion of chilling horror, satirical humour, music and eroticism. The Wicker Tree is a cult masterpiece.

Robin Hardy's long awaited directorial return, The Wicker Tree, is finally on its way after an incredibly turbulent production process. This "spiritual sequel" to Hardy's 1973 masterpiece, The Wicker Man, explores similar themes to its predecessor but is not directly connected to it. It is simply a return to the genre created in The Wicker Man, an eccentric fusion of humour, eroticism, horror and music and is unlikely to be similar to anything you have seen in recent years. After numerous financial meltdowns, false starts and casting changes, this eagerly anticipated project finally got off the ground in 2008 and I am pleased to say it was worth the wait.

The Wicker Tree follows two young evangelist Americans - Beth (Brittania Nicol) and Steve (Henry Garrett), who set off to preach the word of God to the heathens of Scotland (Hardy's tongue remains firmly planted in his cheek). Beth, a successful pop star turned gospel singer, and her Texan cowboy boyfriend, Steve and greeted by powerful Scottish couple, Sir Lachlan (Graham McTavish) and Delia Morrison (Jacqueline Leonard) upon their arrival. The evangelical pair are persuaded to come and preach in the Morrison's home town of Tressock, where they are invited to take leading roles in the annual May Day celebrations - unbeknownst to Steve and Beth, these have sinister consequences.

Before viewing The Wicker Tree, you should be warned that this by no means the straight-forward horror that the trailer implicates. Hardy's emphasis here is clearly set upon comedy and the satire of religious evangelism. Beth and Steve are two characters who know nothing of the word they preach and when faced with answering some of life's most challenging moral dilemmas, they simply state "Well, if its in the Bible then it's what we believe." These characters shape their lives on this concept, placing their hope in a God that they believe will forgive their past mistakes, and it is this theme of misplaced hope that makes The Wicker Tree such an interesting watch. The pair's beliefs are further rocked when they are presented with several temptations in the Pagan playground of Tressock, Steve lured away by lascivious temptress, Lolly (Honeysuckle Weeks) and Beth haunted by her racy pop star past, in the form of a frequently played track called, Trailer Trash Love.

One of the main pleasures of The Wicker Tree is the sense of foreboding throughout, we know the outcome of the film, but it is the ride which Hardy takes us on which makes this feel fresh and exciting. We are treated to a wonderful cameo from Sir Christopher Lee which sums up the main question at the heart of the film - an unidentified older man (potentially The Wicker Man's Lord Summerisle) states to a young boy: "Can fate be altered? This is a question that every religion has tried to answer. And the answer is almost certainly ‘no’." The residents of Tressock have turned to the Goddess, Sulis for hope, where Beth and Steve have placed their faith with the Christian God. This theme of Paganism vs. Christianity strikes a chord with The Wicker Man and once again channels the idea of misplaced hope.

Whilst Hardy does turn everything up to its hammiest, from the thick Texan accents to the pagan weirdness, it still does have several chilling moments. Whether the impending, brutal traditions of the Riding of the Laddie and the crowning of the May Queen, match the sheer terror of the burning Wicker Man, is up for debate but they certainly give it a run for its money.

As to be expected, The Wicker Tree's soundtrack also impresses, featuring a beautiful combination of American gospel and Scottish folk, as well as some trashy country pop. Although it is unfortunate that there is not a Maypole or Tinker of Rye ballad in sight.

Brittania Nicol excels as Beth, showing off a genuinely beautiful voice and a clear acting talent. Beth is deeply flawed but Nicol plays her as such a sweet soul that one cannot help but get attached to the character, despite this. When Beth begins to suspect that she is in danger and confronts the villagers, Nicol is simply magnificent. The role of Steve is also particularly well cast, with Henry Garrett bringing a sense of likeability and humour to the role, as well as a convincing Texan drawl. The pair get the opportunity to show a vast range through the fish out of water elements of Hardy's script, from a lighter comedic side to equally convincing dramatic aspects.

Perhaps the most challenging part to fill is that of Sir Lachlan, a role originally written for Sir Christopher Lee (which he was unable to play, due to back injuries on the set of The Resident) but Graham McTavish manages to make the part his own, bringing a sense of gravitas, intelligence and charisma. Despite several big name actresses in the running for the role of Sir Lachlan's wife (including Faye Dunaway, Vanessa Redgrave & Joan Collins), Delia was eventually played by British soap star, Jacqueline Leonard. Leonard is impressive, channelling Dynasty's Alexis Colby in this sly and manipulative turn. Foyle's War star, Honeysuckle Weeks steps into the role of Lolly (possibly The Wicker Tree's Willow), a character torn between her pagan beliefs and the man she loves. Weeks also picks up a rather strong Scottish accent, which provides some laughs in several of the more erotically charged scenes that she features in. There is also Clive Russell in the wonderfully entertaining role of Beame, the Morrison's butler.

Being a fan of Hardy's source novel, Cowboys For Christ, I did find that several interesting scenes and details had been left out. The Wicker Tree is by no means a long film, at only 92 minutes - it could have benefited by spending more time on the film's final showdown, but given budget constraints this may not have been possible.

The Wicker Tree is truly a one of a kind cinematic experience. Like its thematic predecessor, The Wicker Man, it fuses humour, eroticism, music and horror, with utmost success. The horror comes second to these other aspects, however, with The Wicker Tree's key focus being on its successful satire of religious ideology. Robin Hardy has presented us with a magnificent cinematic romp and one of the most entertaining pictures in recent years.

Reviewer: Andrew McArthur (@andymc35)
Rating: 18
Stars: Graham McTavish, Jacqueline Leonard, Brittania Nicol & Henry Garrett
Director: Robin Hardy
DVD/BR Release: April 30th 2012


Originally posted on http://www.silverscreenslags.com/2012/04/review-wicker-tree.html